Father, Son and Holy CPU

‘The Steel Crocodile’ by D. G. Compton (1970)

When using a computer to predict who the next messiah will be you may want to ask the one doing the thinking if they’re interested in the position.

Compton uses a husband and wife he-said/she-said method to tell the story, alternating between their two viewpoints. One is not complete without the other. The Steel Crocodile was nominated for the Nebula Award.

“Society evolved. Perhaps man was too multifold ever to control its direction.” (p. 23)

“Some people are more afraid of peacefulness than anything else. Witness the fate of Christ.” (p. 50)

“Science works on the principle that the purpose of life is life.” (p. 68)

“People’s vision is limited. They go for the short-term gain, the immediate benefit. That’s what’s wrong with democracy.” (p. 133)

“Our social balance is precarious…Sustained by oblique oppression. Democracy is eroded almost beyond recognition. The established churches have become little more than social clubs.” (p. 171)

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About Marcus

Who me? Introverted, neurotic, self-absorbed, increasingly cynical observer of human nature and part time social critic in hiding. Most of my life spent avoiding growing up. The naive idealistic passions of youth have evolved into the eclectic eccentricities of adulthood. Northeast Florida small-town native, related to people I can't relate to. Simultaneously my own best friend and worst enemy. Politically and spiritually unaffiliated, my personal ideologies put me all over the map or off it completely.
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